Books on Cognitive Psychology

See also:    Cognitive Psychology   


Armstrong, Thomas
Based on psychologist Howard Gardner's pioneering theory of "multiple intelligences," the original edition of 7 Kinds of Smart identified seven distinct ways of being smart, including "word smart," "music smart," "logic smart," and "people smart." Now, with the addition of two new kinds of smart--"naturalist" and "existential"--7 Kinds of Smart offers even more interesting information about how the human psyche functions. Complete with checklists for determining one's strongest and weakest intelligences, exercises, practical tips for developing each type of smart, a revised bibliography for further reading, and a guide to related Internet sites, this book continues to be an essential resource, offering cutting-edge research for general consumption.

Armstrong, Thomas
Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences has revolutionized the way we think about being smart. Teachers are using multiple intelligences curricula in their classrooms. Multiple intelligences schools have been established in several states. No longer are teachers asking about students, "How smart are they?" Instead, they're asking, "How are they smart?" In his latest book, Thomas Armstrong takes a refreshing new approach to the topic: teaching kids themselves about multiple intelligences. In clear, simple language, he introduces the theory, explains the eight intelligences in school, expand their multiple intelligences at home, and draw on them to plan for the future. Resources point the way to books, software, games, and organizations that can help kids develop the eight intelligences. This timely, important book is recommended for all kids, their parents, and educators.

Armstrong, Thomas
"To respect the many differences between people"--this is what Howard Gardner says is the purpose of learning about multiple intelligences (MI). Now, in the 2nd edition of Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, Thomas Armstrong has updated his best-selling practical guide for educators, to incorporate new research from Gardner and others. Gardner's original studies suggested that the human mind is composed of seven intelligences--linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal. This new edition includes information on the eighth intelligence (the naturalist), a chapter on a possible ninth intelligence (the existential), and updated information and resources throughout the text to help educators at all levels apply MI theory to curriculum development, lesson planning, assessment, special education, cognitive skills, educational technology, career development, educational policy, and more. The book includes dozens of practical tips, strategies, and examples from real schools and districts. Armstrong provides tools, resources, and ideas that educators can immediately use to help students of all ages achieve their fullest potential in life. Thomas Armstrong, an educator and psychologist from Sonoma County, California, has more than 27 years of teaching experience, from the primary through the doctoral level. He is the author of two other ASCD books, Awakening Genius in the Classroom and ADD/ADHD Alternatives in the Classroom.

Armstrong, Thomas
Does your child have a favorite subject, activity, or hobby? Children learn in multiple ways, and educator Thomas Armstrong has shown hundreds of thousands of parents and teachers how to locate those unique areas in each of our children where learning and creativity seem to flow with special vigor. In this fully updated classic on multiple intelligences, Armstrong sheds new light on the "eight ways to bloom," or the eight kinds of "multiple intelligences." While everyone possesses all eight intelligences, Armstrong delineates how to discover your child's particular areas of strength among them. The book shatters the conventional wisdom that brands our students as "underachievers," "unmotivated," or as suffering from "learning disabilities," "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder," or other "learning diseases." Armstrong explains how these flawed labels often overlook students who are in possession of a distinctive combination of multiple intelligences, and demonstrates how to help them acquire knowledge and skills according to their sometimes extraordinary aptitudes. Filled with resources for the home and classroom, this new edition of In Their Own Way offers inspiration for every learning situation.

Astington, Janet Wilde; Baird, Jodie A.
"Theory of mind" is the phrase researchers use to refer to children's understanding of people as mental beings, who have beliefs, desires, emotions, and intentions, and whose actions and interactions can be interpreted and explained by taking account of these mental states. The gradual development of children's theory of mind, particularly during the early years, is by now well described in the research literature. What is lacking, however, is a decisive explanation of how children acquire this understanding. Recent research has shown strong relations between children's linguistic abilities and their theory of mind. Yet exactly what role these abilities play is controversial and uncertain. The purpose of this book is to provide a forum for the leading scholars in the field to explore thoroughly the role of language in the development of the theory of mind. This volume will appeal to students and researchers in developmental and cognitive psychology.

Baron-Cohen, Simon
In Mindblindness, Simon Baron-Cohen presents a model of the evolution and development of 'mindreading.' He argues that we mindread all the time, effortlessly, automatically, and mostly unconsciously. It is the natural way in which we interpret, predict, and participate in social behavior and communication. We ascribe mental states to people: states such as thoughts, desires, knowledge, and intentions. Building on many years of research, Baron-Cohen concludes that children with autism, suffer from 'mindblindness' as a result of a selective impairment in mindreading. For these children, the world is essentially devoid of mental things. Baron-Cohen develops a theory that draws on data from comparative psychology, from developmental, and from neuropsychology. He argues that specific neurocognitive mechanisms have evolved that allow us to mindread, to make sense of actions, to interpret gazes as meaningful, and to decode 'the language of the eyes.' A Bradford Book. Learning, Development, and Conceptual Change series

Baron-Cohen, Simon
We all know the opposite sex can be a baffling, even infuriating, species. Why do most men use the phone to exchange information rather than have a chat? Why do women love talking about relationships and feelings with their girlfriends while men seem drawn to computer games, new gadgets, or the latest sports scores? Does it really all just come down to our upbringing? In The Essential Difference, leading psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen confirms what most of us had suspected all along: that male and female brains are different. This groundbreaking and controversial study reveals the scientific evidence (present even in one-day-old babies) that proves that female-type brains are better at empathizing and communicating, while male brains are stronger at understanding and building systems-not just computers and machinery, but abstract systems such as politics and music. Most revolutionary of all, The Essential Difference also puts forward the compelling new theory that autism (and its close relative, Asperger's Syndrome) is actually an example of the extreme male brain. His theory can explain why those who live with this condition are brilliant at analyzing the most complex systems yet cannot relate to the emotional lives of those with whom they live. Understanding our essential difference, Baron-Cohen concludes, may help us not only make sense of our partners' foibles, but also solve one of the most mysterious scientific riddles of our time.

Baron-Cohen, Simon
Newly available in paperback, this is the first book to bring together classic and contemporary readings illustrating the new subdiscipline, evolutionary psychopathology. Each chapter demonstrates how evolutionary arguments are being brought to bear on the study of a different psychiatric condition or pathalogical behaviour. The Maladapted Mind is aimed primarily at advanced students and researchers in the fields of psychiatry, abnormal psychology, biological anthropology, evolutionary biology, and cognitive science.

Baron-Cohen, Simon
If your child or student can't recognize the expression of surprise, stress, joy, or any one of 409 additional emotions, Mind Reading is an engaging computer program with actors who depict emotional levels from the simple to the complex. An invaluable resource for teachers and parents of children on the autism spectrum, Mind Reading can also be utilized by people working in the dramatic arts. It offers a variety of fames, lessons, quizzes and rewards for learning or recognizing emotional expression. *Actor Daniel Radcliffe, who played Harry Potter, plays a part in Mind Reading.

Baron-Cohen, Simon; Luchmaya, Svetlana; Knickmeyer, Rebecca
This pioneering study looks at the effects of prenatal testosterone on postnatal development and behavior. Hormonal effects on behavior have long been studied in animals; the unique contribution of this book is to suggest a connection between human fetal hormones and later behavior. It details for the first time testosterone's effect on social and language development, opening a new avenue of research for cognitive neuroscience.<br><br> The authors look at samples of amniotic fluid taken during amniocentesis at 16 weeks' gestation, and relate the fetal level of testosterone (which is present in fetuses of both sexes, although in different quantities) to behavior at ages 1, 2, and 4 years. They argue that the amniotic fluid provides a window into the child's past -- a chemical record of that child's time in the womb -- that allows informed prediction about the child's future brain, mind, and behavior. This is not the retrospective speculation of psychoanalysis, they point out, but an opportunity to study development prospectively and trace developmental precursors and causes of later cognition.<br><br> The study suggests that prenatal levels of testosterone affect a range of later behaviors in children, from the inclination to make eye contact with others to the size of the vocabulary. It also suggests that prenatal testosterone level may be related to the development of typically "masculine" and "feminine" behaviors. The study's ongoing research explores whether fetal testosterone has any link with the risk of developing autism. Connecting endocrinology and psychology, the authors propose that there is a biological component to behaviors often thought to be produced by the social environment.

Baron-Cohen, Simon; Tager-Flusberg, Helen
Like the first edition, this completely updated and revised text still focuses on the 'theory of mind' hypothesis--an important new psychological approach to autism-- and provides an invaluable discussion about the natre of what is widely recognized as the most severe childhood psychological disorder. But it provides expanded coverage of evolution and new sections on infancy, neurobiology, and cognitive neuroscience.

Bates, Elizabeth; Tomasello, Michael
Research on child language is an interdisciplinary enterprise, uniting the efforts of psychologists, linguists, computer scientists, educators, neuroscientists and communication scientists. In selecting representative readings from this broad and fast-moving field, the editors of this collection have emphasized recent papers that illustrate the contribution of child language research to developmental cognitive science. Although the authors of these papers represent a broad spectrum of theoretical perspectives, there is a deliberate bias in favor of an interactive, rather than nativist, approach. Essential works on the major milestones of language development are provided, followed by tutorials that stress the neural substrates of language development, pieces on computational models of language learning, and on genetic contributions to developmental language disorders. Some papers have been updated or specially commissioned for this collection. The volume avoids jargon and is designed to be accessible to upper level students across a range of disciplines.

Blakemore, Sarah-Jane; Frith, Uta
Forced learning, or "hot-housing", of infants has become increasingly popular in recent years - but does it work? The plasticity of the adolescent and adult brain is becoming gradually acknowledged by brain scientists. What does this say about lifelong learning? In this groundbreaking book, two scientists take stock of what is now known about how and when the brain learns, and consider the implications of this knowledge for educational policy and practice. Blakemore and Frith break new ground by drawing out the relevance of brain research to education. After reviewing brain development and learning from infancy, through school years to adolescence and adulthood, they explore how the brain can change and learn at any age. They consider naturally learned skills, such as emotional and social competence, and formally taught skills, such as reading, writing and arithmetic. They also take a look at the potential of new ways to improve learning, including physical and mental exercise, sleep and diet. An important part of the book deals with brain research on learning difficulties, such as dyslexia, dyscalculia, attention deficit and autism, and how this research can inform remedial education. This landmark book will be of interest to students of psychology and education, teachers, psychologists, educational policy-makers, and parents.

Bogdashina, Olga
Providing a theoretical foundation for understanding communication and language impair-ments specific to autism, Olga Bogdashina explores the effects of different perceptual and cognitive styles on the communication and language development of autistic children. She stresses the importance of identifying each autistic individual's nonverbal language – which can be visual, tactile, kinaesthetic, auditory, olfactory or gustatory – with a view to establish a shared means of verbal communication. She offers an explanation of why certain approaches, for example PECS, might work with some autistic children but not others. Offering real in-sights, the 'What They Say' sections enable the reader to see through the eyes of autistic indi-viduals and to understand their language differences first hand. 'What We Can Do to Help' sections throughout the book give practical recommenda-tions on what to do in order to help autistic individuals use their natural mechanisms to learn and develop social and communicative skills. The final chapters are devoted to assessment and intervention issues with practical recommendations for selecting appropriate methods and techniques to enhance communication, based on the specific mode of communication a person uses.

Bogdashina, Olga
Inspired by the often uncomfortable interplay between autistic individuals, parents and professionals in understanding autistic spectrum conditions, Olga Bogdashina uses the concept of Theory of Mind (ToM) to consider these groups' different (and often conflicting) perspectives. ToM is the ability to imagine and make judgements about what others feel and think; its absence in autistic individuals is called 'mindblindness'. This book addresses the 'mindblindness' of people united in their interest in autism but divided by their different angles and perspectives. Divided into four parts, the book first defines autism, then the views of the three main groups working with it – autistic individuals, parents and professionals – under the headings of classifications, diagnosis, causes, development, theories and treatment. By comparing and reconciling the different perspectives in this way, the book helps each group to understand and predict each other's responses and behaviours. This enlightening and innovative book offers a unique way of 'stepping in each other's shoes' and is a valuable resource for all people living or working with autism.

Boucher, Jill
Many people with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are remarkably proficient at remembering how things look and sound, even years after an event. They are also good at rote learning and establishing habits and routines. Some even have encyclopaedic memories. However, all individuals with ASD have difficulty in recalling personal memories and reliving experiences, and less able people may have additional difficulty in memorising facts. This book assembles new research on memory in autism to examine why this happens and the effects it has on people's lives. The contributors utilise recent advances in the understanding of normal memory systems and their breakdown as frameworks for analysing the neuropsychology and neurobiology of memory in autism. The unique patterning of memory functions across the spectrum illuminates difficulties with sense of self, emotion processing, mental time travel, language and learning, providing a window into the nature and causes of autism itself.

Bragdon, Allen D.; Gamon, David
Conditions such as color blindness, seasonal affective disorder, alcoholism, attention deficit disorder, dyslexia, obesity, autism, synesthesia, and even deja vu all have specific brain-to-body connections. This book provides insights into the symptoms, causes, and consequences of these abnormalities in their milder forms, as well as correlations with other health matters that statistically accompany each condition. Checklists and testing exercises used for professional diagnosis of these cognitive abnormalities are provided, as are probable causes and consequences of each.

Broman, Sarah; Grafman, Jordan
This volume discusses the research findings from studies of autism and Williams and Turner syndromes. Using neurobiological and behavioural techniques, these studies can provide insights into the localization of cognitive function and the developmental course of atypical cognitive profiles.

Brougher, Kerry; Strick, Jeremy
This ground-breaking new book and the exhibition it accompanies trace the history of a revolutionary idea: that fine art should attain the abstract purity of music. Over the past one hundred years some of the most adventurous modern and contemporary artists have explored unorthodox means to invent a kinetic, non-representational art modeled upon pure instrumental music. Music has inspired some of the most progressive art of our time—from the abstract painting of Wassily Kandinsky and Frantisek Kupka to the mid-century experimental films of Oskar Fischinger and Harry Smith to contemporary installations by Jennifer Steinkamp and Jim Hodges. While early abstract paintings tended to approach music metonymically, the color organs, films, light shows, and installations from the mid-twentieth century to the present day engage a range of perceptual faculties simultaneously to create a plethora of sensations in the viewer. The most complete examination of this phenomenon to date, Visual Music features ninety major works of art plus related documentation, focusing on abstract and mixed-media art and the connections to musical forms as varied as classical, jazz, and electronic. The book includes three scholarly essays, each discussing a distinct art historical period in depth, and an additional essay by Olivia Mattis that approaches the subject from a musicologist's perspective, as well as a chronology, artist biographies, and a selected bibliography.

Brune, Martin
Provides an inter-disciplinary exploration of the development of social cognition in humans and looks at the psychiatric implications when these processes go awry. The resulting brain disorders or psychopathologies can manifest in various forms such as autism, schizophrenia, delusional disorders, affective disorders (bipolar disease), and borderline personality disorders of old age (dementia). There is increasing interest in what determines our social awareness and behaviour and essentially this book applies "theory of mind" to psychiatry and psychopathology. With contributions from leading authorities in the field, this will be a standard reference for years to come.

Carruthers, Peter, Editor; Smith, Peter K., Editor
Theories of theories of mind brings together contributions by a distinguished international team of philosophers, psychologists and primatologists, who between them address such questions as: what is it to understand the thoughts, feelings and intentions of other people? How does such an understanding develop in the normal child? Why, unusually, does it fail to develop? And is any such mentalistic understanding shared by members of other species? The volume's four parts together offer a state of the art survey of the major topics in the theory-theory/simulationism debate within philosophy of mind, developmental psychology, the 'tiology of autism and primatology. The editors have provided an introduction which maps the content of the book and surveys the recent history of the field, and a consolidated bibliography which will provide a useful reference resource for all those interested in this area. The volume will be of great interest to researchers and students in all areas interested in the 'theory of mind' debate.

Cytowic, Richard
In 1980, Richard Cytowic was having dinner at a friend's house, when his host exclaimed, "Oh, dear, there aren't enough points on the chicken." With that casual comment began Cytowic's journey into the condition known as synesthesia. The ten people in one million who are synesthetes are born into a world where one sensation (such as sound) conjures up one or more others (such as taste or color). Although scientists have known about synesthesia for two hundred years, until now the condition has remained a mystery. Extensive experiments with more than forty synesthetes led Richard Cytowic to an explanation of synesthesia--and to a new conception of the organization of the mind, one that emphasized the primacy of emotion over reason. Because there were not enough points on chicken served at a dinner almost two decades ago, Cytowic came to explore a deeper reality that he believes exists in all individuals, but usually below the surface of awareness. In this medical detective adventure, he reveals the brain to be an active explorer, not just a passive receiver, and offers a new view of what it means to be human--a view that turns upside down conventional ideas about reason, emotion, and who we are.

Cytowic, Richard
For decades, scientists who heard about synesthesia hearing colors, tasting words, seeing colored pain just shrugged their shoulders or rolled their eyes. Now, as irrefutable evidence mounts that some healthy brains really do this, we are forced to ask how this squares with some cherished conceptions of neuroscience. These include binding, modularity, functionalism, blindsight, and consciousness. The good news is that when old theoretical structures fall, new light may flood in. Far from a mere curiosity, synesthesia illuminates a wide swath of mental life. In this classic text, Richard Cytowic quickly disposes of earlier criticisms that the phenomenon cannot be "real," demonstrating that it is indeed brain-based. Following a historical introduction, he lays out the phenomenology of synesthesia in detail and gives criteria for clinical diagnosis and an objective "test of genuineness." He reviews theories and experimental procedures to localize the plausible level of the neuraxis at which synesthesia operates. In a discussion of brain development and neural plasticity, he addresses the possible ubiquity of neonatal synesthesia, the construction of metaphor, and whether everyone is unconsciously synesthetic. In the closing chapters, Cytowic considers synesthetes' personalities, the apparent frequency of the trait among artists, and the subjective and illusory nature of what we take to be objective reality, particularly in the visual realm. The second edition has been extensively revised, reflecting the recent flood of interest in synesthesia and new knowledge of human brain function and development. More than two-thirds of the material is new.

Ferrara, Nadia

Frith, Uta; Hill, Elisabeth
Text is derived from a Theme Issue first published by Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Series B. Focuses on new ideas and clinical findings influencing the understanding of autism and its variants. Discusses various therapeutic approaches. Hardcover, softcover also available.

Garcia Winner, Michele
One of the most successful tools used at Michelle G. Winner's Center for Social Thinking is the Social Behavior Map (SBM). Michelle developed the SBM as a cognitive behavior strategy to teach individuals about the specific relationship between behaviors, other's perspective, other's actions (consequences), and the student's own emotions about those around him or her. The SBM is a visual tool that displays these abstract concepts through a flow chart. Now, Michelle and her team of talented therapists have created a collection of over 50 Social Behavior Maps covering a range of topics for home, community and the classroom. Social Behavior Mapping - Connecting Behavior, Emotions and Consequences Across the Day is geared for use by parents and professionals to help those with social thinking challenges understand what behaviors are expected and unexpected in a way that makes sense to their way of thinking.

Gardner, Howard
A brilliant state-of-the-art report on how the landmark theory of multiple intelligences is radically changing our understanding of education and human development. Since its original description in Frames of Mind (1983, 1993), the theory of multiple intelligences has taken its place as one of the seminal ideas of the twentieth century. Further explicated in Gardner's 1993 book, Multiple Intelligences, these ideas continue to attract attention and generate controversy all over the world. Now, in Intelligence Reframed, Gardner provides a much-needed state of the art report on the theory. He describes how it has evolved and been revised. He introduces two new intelligences, and argues that the concept of intelligence should be broadened, but not so much that it includes every human faculty and value. In addition, he offers practical guidance on the educational uses of the theory, and responds in lively dialogue to the critiques leveled against it. Harvard psychologist Howard Gardner has been acclaimed as the most influential educational theorist since John Dewey. His ideas about intelligence and creativity - explicated in such bestselling books as Frames of Mind and Multiple Intelligences (over 200,000 copies in print combined) - have revolutionized our thinking. In his groundbreaking 1983 book Frames of Mind, Howard Gardner first introduced the theory of multiple intelligences, which posits that intelligence is more than a single property of the human mind. That theory has become widely accepted as one of the seminal ideas of the twentieth century and continues to attract attention all over the world. Now in Intelligence Reframed, Gardner provides a much-needed report on the theory, its evolution and revisions. He offers practical guidance on the educational uses of the theory and responds to the critiques leveled against him. He also introduces two new intelligences (existential intelligence and naturalist intelligence) and argues that the concept of intelligence should be broadened, but not so absurdly that it includes every human virtue and value. Ultimately, argues Gardner, possessing a basic set of seven or eight intelligences is not only a unique trademark of the human species, but also perhaps even a working definition of the species. Gardner also offers provocative ideas about creativity, leadership, and moral excellence, and speculates about the relationship between multiple intelligences and the world of work in the future.

Gardner, Howard
Howard Gardner is the John H. and Elisabeth A. Hobbs Professor in Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Among numerous honors, Gardner received a MacArthur Prize Fellowship in 1981. In 1990, he was the first American to receive the University of Louisville's Grawemeyer Award in education. In 2000, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Gardner, Howard
Explains how multiple intelligences could help inform teachers to teach and evaluate students in new and better ways.

Gazzaniga, Michael
Each edition of this classic reference has proved to be a benchmark in the developing field of cognitive neuroscience. The third edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences continues to chart new directions in the study of the biologic underpinnings of complex cognition -- the relationship between the structural and physiological mechanisms of the nervous system and the psychological reality of the mind. Every chapter is new and each section has new participants. Features of the third edition include research that maps biological changes directly to cognitive changes; a new and integrated view of sensory systems and perceptual processes; the presentation of new developments in plasticity; recent research on the cognitive neuroscience of false memory, which reveals the constructive nature of memory retrieval; and new topics in the neuroscientific study of emotion, including the "social brain." The new final section, "Perspectives and New Directions," discusses a wide variety of topics that point toward the future of this vibrant and exciting field.

Gyori, Miklos
The present volume attempts to integrate two streams of cognitive research which often run parallel: largely conceptual investigations on the overall framework of human cognition, and the much more empirical study of neurocognitive developmental disorders - in this case: autism.

Harrison, John E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon
Synaesthesia is a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality automatically triggers a perceptual experience in another. For example, on hearing a sound, the person immediately sees a color. How does this happen? Is it a real phenomenon? Why do some people develop this condition and not others? And might synaesthesia unlock important clues about the organization of the normal brain? This volume brings together what is known about this fascinating neurological condition. The above questions, and new issues arising from the recent wave of cognitive neuroscientific research into synaesthesia, are debated in a series of chapters by leading authorities in the field. The book will be of great interest to researchers and students in the cognitive neurosciences, and is intended to spark further investigation into this relatively neglected, extraordinary phenomenon.

Heilman, Kenneth; Valenstein, Edward
Clinical Neuropsychology comprehensively reviews the major neurobehavioral disorders associated with brain dysfunction. Since the third edition appeared in 1993 there have been many advances in the understanding and treatment of neurobehavioral disorders. This edition, like prior editions, describes the classical signs and symptoms associated with the major behavioral disorders such as aphasia, agraphia, alexia, amnesia, apraxia, neglect, executive disorders and dementia. It also discusses advances in assessing, diagnosing and treating these disorders and it addresses the brain mechanisms underlying these deficits. A multi-authored text has the advantage of having authorities write about the disorders in which they have expertise. The fourth edition adds new authors and five entirely new chapters on phonologic aspects of language disorders, syntactic aspects of language disorders, lexical-semantic aspects of language disorders, anosognosia, hallucinations and related conditions. This is the most comprehensive edition of this text to date. It will be of value to clinicians, investigators, and students from a variety of disciplines, including neurology, psychology, cognitive neuroscience, psychiatry, and speech pathology.

Hobson, Peter
Imaginative and creative thought is what distinguishes humans from animals. It is what defines us as Homo sapiens. What it means to have thoughts, and what gives us the remarkable capacity to think, have been subjects of debate for centuries. In The Cradle of Thought, Peter Hobson presents a new and provocative theory about the nature and origins of uniquely human thinking. A prevailing opinion on the acquisition of thought and language is that babies are born with pre-programmed modules in the brain. But this is too narrow and too simplistic an explanation. Professor Hobson's radical view is that what gives us the capacity to think is the quality of a baby's exchanges with other people over the first 18 months of life. As part and parcel of an intellectual revolution in the second year, the child achieves new insight into the minds of itself and others. Human thought, language, and self-awareness are developed in the cradle of emotional engagement between infant and caregiver; social contact has vital significance for mental development. Professor Hobson draws on 20 years of clinical experience and academic research as a developmental psychologist, psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. He follows the thread of mental development over the first 18 months of ababy's life to describe and to explain the emergence of thinking; he shares startling insights into mental development gained from his studies of autism; and he shows how, from infancy to adulthood, disturbances of thinking may be rooted in troubled early relationships. Finally, he pinpoints tiny but momentus changes in the social relations of pre-human primates from which human thought sprang. In this fascinating and thought-provoking book, Peter Hobson shows how very early engagement with others fosters the child's growth out of the cradle of infancy and into the realm of human thought and culture.

Lezak, Muriel Deutsch
Now with more than double the number of references than the previous edition, this landmark volume has been updated to address current assessment techniques and procedures.

Luria, Aleksandr Romanovich

Luria, Aleksandr Romanovich
Russian psychologist A. R. Luria presents a compelling portrait of a man's heroic struggle to regain his mental faculties. A soldier named Zasetsky, wounded in the head at the battle of Smolensk in 1943, suddenly found himself in a frightening world: he could recall his childhood but not his recent past; half his field of vision had been destroyed; he had great difficulty speaking, reading, and writing. Woven throughout his first-person account are interpolations by Luria himself, which serve as excellent brief introductions to the topic of brain structure and function.

Luria, Aleksandr Romanovich
The Mind of a Mnemonist is a rare phenomenon - a scientific study that transcends its data and, in the manner of the best fictional literature, fashions a portrait of an unforgettable human being.

Luria, Aleksandr Romanovich
A classic; essential reading for neuropsychologists and neuroscientists.

Manning, John T.; Trivers, Robert, Editor
Could the length of your fingers predict a predisposition to breast cancer? Or musical genius? Or homosexuality? In Digit Ratio, John T. Manning posits that relative lengths of the second and fourth digits in humans (2D:4D ratio) does provide such a window into fertility-and sex-related traits.

Mesulam, M-Marsel
This thoroughly revised new edition of a classic book provides a clinically inspired but scientifically guided approach to the biological foundations of human mental function in health and disease. It includes authoritative coverage of all the major areas related to behavioral neurology, neuropsychology, and neuropsychiatry. Each chapter, written by a world-renowned expert in the relevant area, provides an introductory background as well as an up-to-date review of the most recent developments. Clinical relevance is emphasized but is placed in the context of cognitive neuroscience, basic neuroscience, and functional imaging. Major cognitive domains such as frontal lobe function, attention and neglect, memory, language, prosody, complex visual processing, and object identification are reviewed in detail. A comprehensive chapter on behavioral neuroanatomy provides a background for brain-behavior interactions in the cerebral cortex, limbic system, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebullum. Chapters on the temperolimbic epilepsy, major psychiatric syndromes, and dementia provide in-depth analyses of these neurobehavioral entrities and their neurological coordinates. Changes for this second edition include the reflection throughout the book of the new and flourishing alliance of behavioral neurology, neuropsychology, and neuropsychiatry with cognitive neuroscience;major revision of all chapters; new authorship of those on language and memory; and the inclusion of entirely new chapters on psychiatric syndromes and dementias. Both as a textbook and a reference work, the second edition of Principles of Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology represents an invaluable resource for behavioral neurologists, neuropsychologists, neuropsychiatrists, cognitive and basic neuroscientists, geriatricians, physiatrists, and their students and trainees.

Mitchell, Peter
The human intellect allows us to acquire a conception of mind. The mind has evolved into such a powerful form that we are able to go beyond knowing the world and move towards knowing the mind itself. Being able to comprehend the mind permits smooth scial interaction, since it allows us to anticipate the futue actions of thse around us. The apparently effortless quality of social co-ordination belies the complex process of conceptualization and inference that is actually at work. The odyssey of childhood, especially in the early years, presents a topic for investigation and speculation.; This text covers development from infancy to adulthood, and also considers related disorders of development especially autism. It goes beyond the narrow focus of preschool. Another purpose of the text is to challenge the widely held view that children progress to a higher stage of understanding mind following a radical shift in their thinking that supposedly takes place at four years of age. An alternative account that is presented as more plasusible, states that children have some potential from a very early age to understand about mind, but are largely trapped in the world of material reality. Development, then, seen as the quest to overcome an attentional bias to reality, that is bound to inhibit the contemplation of mind.; A vital ingredient in the success of this development is seen as the ability to use language as a vehicle for communication. Language could serve as a tool that helps the child to think more in the abstract and hypothetical, once removed fro reality.

Mitchell, Peter

Nakajima, Teruo, Editor; Ono, Taketoshi, Editor
This book presents a complete account of the 18th International Taniguchi Symposium on Brain Sciences, held on the island of Hawaii, February 5-8, 1995. The first part of this comprehensive volume examines emotion, including the limbic system, animal models of autism, the neuronal mechanism of emotion and behavior, and a PET study on depression. The second section focuses on the brain mechanisms of memory and covers the hippocampal place code, long-term and short-term memory, and neuro-psychological studies on amnesic patients. The final part covers brain mechanisms of normal and abnormal behavior, visual processing within the temporal cortex, perception of geometric illusions, inhibition and facilitation of visual-motor links, self-mutilation, and a neuroanatomical study on cognitive aging. A neurochemical study on sleep and wakefulness is included. This reference will be useful in furthering not only basic neuroscience but also neuropsychiatry in years to come.

Pinker, Stephen
In this extraordinary bestseller, Steven Pinker, one of the world's leading cognitive scientists, does for the rest of the mind what he did for language in his 1994 book, The Language Instinct. He explains what the mind is, how it evolved, and how it allows us to see, think, feel, laugh, interact, enjoy the arts, and ponder the mysteries of life. And he does it with the wit that prompted Mark Ridley to write in the New York Times Book Review, "No other science writer makes me laugh so much. . . . [Pinker] deserves the superlatives that are lavished on him." The arguments in the book are as bold as its title. Pinker rehabilitates some unfashionable ideas, such as that the mind is a computer and that human nature was shaped by natural selection, and challenges fashionable ones, such as that passionate emotions are irrational, that parents socialize their children, and that nature is good and modern society corrupting.

Povinelli, David
From an early age, humans know a surprising amount about basic physical principles, such as gravity, force, mass, and shape. We can see this in the way that young children play, and manipulate objects around them. The same behavior has long been observed in primates - chimpanzees have been shown to possess a remarkable ability to make and use simple tools. But what does this tell us about their inner mental state - do they therefore share the same understanding to that of a young child? Do they understand the simple, underlying physical principles involved? Though some people would say that they do, this book reports groundbreaking research that questions whether this really is the case. Folk Physics for Apes challenges the assumptions so often made about apes. It offers us a rare glimpse into the workings of another mind, examining how apes perceive and understand the physical world - an understanding that appears to be both similar to, and yet profoundly different from our own. The book will have broad appeal to evolutionary psychologists, developmental psychologists, and those interested in the sub-disciplines of cognitive science (philosophy, anthropology). The book additionally offers for developmental psychologists some valuable new non-verbal techniques for assessing causal understanding in young children.

Ratey, John J.
John Ratey, bestselling author and clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, here lucidly explains the human brains workings, and paves the way for a better understanding of how the brain affects who we are. Ratey provides insight into the basic structure and chemistry of the brain, and demonstrates how its systems shape our perceptions, emotions, and behavior. By giving us a greater understanding of how the brain responds to the guidance of its user, he provides us with knowledge that can enable us to improve our lives. In A Users Guide to the Brain, Ratey clearly and succinctly surveys what scientists now know about the brain and how we use it. He looks at the brain as a malleable organ capable of improvement and change, like any muscle, and examines the way specific motor functions might be applied to overcome neural disorders ranging from everyday shyness to autism. Drawing on examples from his practice and from everyday life, Ratey illustrates that the most important lesson we can learn about our brains is how to use them to their maximum potential.

Reinecke, Mark A., Editor; Dattilio, Frank M., Editor; Freeman, Arthur, Editor
While cognitive-behavioral therapy has developed rapidly in recent years, its application with children and adolescents has received only minimal attention. Expanding the boundaries of contemporary cognitive-behavioral therapy, this much-needed volume addresses myriad up-to-date strategies and techniques for treating common difficulties experienced by children and adolescents. Grounded in a strong developmental orientation, contributing authors address numerous disorders that are commonly confronted by mental health professionals working with children and their families, as well as other problems that are encountered less frequently. Chapters begin with a review of the relevant literature, then present extended case examples, including DSM-IV diagnoses, which clearly demonstrate the use and implementation of cognitive-behavioral techniques.

Repacholi, Betty; Slaughter, Virginia
Over the last fifteen years, developmentalists, cognitive scientists, philosophers, educators and clinicians have considered the acquisition of a theory of mind - the capacity to predict and explain behavior on the basis of internal, subjective mental states - to be one of the crucial cognitive achievements of early childhood. This volume represents the first collection of work to address, empirically and conceptually, the topic of individual differences in theory of mind. It is also unique because it takes the reader beyond the preschool years, to explore theory of mind development in late childhood and adulthood.

Robertson, Lynn; Sagiv, Noam
Owing to its bizarre nature and its implications for understanding how brains work, synesthesia has recently received a lot of attention in the popular press and motivated a great deal of research and discussion among scientists. The questions generated by these two communities are intriguing: Does the synesthetic phenomenon require awareness and attention? How does a feature that is not present become bound to one that is? Does synesthesia develop or is it hard wired? Should it change our way of thinking about perceptual experience in general? What is its value in understanding perceptual systems as a whole? This volume brings together a distinguished group of investigators from diverse backgrounds--among them neuroscientists, novelists, and synesthetes themselves--who provide fascinating answers to these questions. Although each approaches synesthesia from a very different perspective, and each was curious about and investigated synesthesia for very different reasons, the similarities between their work cannot be ignored. The research presented in this volume demonstrates that it is no longer reasonable to ask whether or not synesthesia is real--we must now ask how we can account for it from cognitive, neurobiological, developmental, and evolutionary perspectives. This book will be important reading for any scientist interested in brain and mind, not to mention synesthetes themselves, and others who might be wondering what all the fuss is about.

Rogers, Sally
From earliest infancy, a typically developing child imitates or mirrors the facial expressions, postures and gestures, and emotional behavior of others. Where does this capacity come from, and what function does it serve? What happens when imitation is impaired? Synthesizing cutting-edge research emerging from a range of disciplines, this important book examines the role of imitation in both autism and typical development. Topics include the neural and evolutionary bases of imitation, its pivotal connections to language development and relationships, and how early imitative deficits in autism might help explain the more overt social and communication problems of older children and adults.

Rosenzweig, Mark R.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Watson, Neil V.
Biological Psychology is a comprehensive survey of the biological bases of behavior that is authoritative and up-to-date. Designed for undergraduates enrolled in Biological Psychology, Physiological Psychology, or Behavioral Neuroscience, the book continues to offer an outstanding illustration program that engages students, making even complicated topics and chains of events clear. The book offers a broad perspective, encompassing lucid descriptions of behavior, evolutionary history, development, proximate mechanisms, and applications. New coauthor Neil V. Watson brings his expert knowledge of the field and the course to the Fourth Edition. This edition is designed to make the book even more readable. Each chapter has been made more concise and now begins with a brief narrative relating the topic to the human condition. The new edition boasts hundreds of new references, including research students may have encountered in the popular media. Yet critical thinking skills are also honed as the reader is alerted to the many widely-held myths about the neuroscience of behavior (different parts of the tongue detect only certain flavors, dogs are color-blind, sleep deprivation makes you crazy), and educated about facts that sound so unlikely to the uninformed (some people cannot feel pain, in some animals only half the brain sleeps at a time, ears make sounds, some people cannot form new memories, experience alters the structure of the brain). Thorough and reader-friendly, Biological Psychology reveals the fascinating interactions of brain and behavior.

Sacks, Oliver
In his most extraordinary book, "one of the great clinical writers of the 20th century" (The New York Times) recounts the case histories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders. Oliver Sacks's The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; who are stricken with violent tics and grimaces or who shout involuntary obscenities; whose limbs have become alien; who have been dismissed as retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents. If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales remain, in Dr. Sacks's splendid and sympathetic telling, deeply human. They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do. A great healer, Sacks never loses sight of medicine's ultimate responsibility: "the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject."

Sacks, Oliver
Awakenings--which inspired the major motion picture--is the remarkable story of a group of patients who contracted sleeping-sickness during the great epidemic just after World War I. Frozen for decades in a trance-like state, these men and women were given up as hopeless until 1969, when Dr. Oliver Sacks gave them the then-new drug L-DOPA, which had an astonishing, explosive, "awakening" effect. Dr. Sacks recounts the moving case histories of his patients, their lives, and the extraordinary transformations which went with their reintroduction to a changed world.

Sasson, Noah
Same-race faces are better discriminated and recognized than less experienced, other-races faces. This "Own-Race Bias" (ORB) has been robustly demonstrated in many psychological studies, yet the perceptual basis of this phenomenon is still not well understood. Recent face perception studies have discovered that configural properties of the face (i.e., the spatial relations among features) are processed differently than featural information, and may be directly tied to developmental experience with faces. This study examines age-related changes in the ORB and seeks to determine whether a superior developmental improvement in the perception of configural information in more experienced same-race faces contributes to the emergence of the ORB. A sample of children and adults with high-functioning autism were also included to test whether these processes differ for this population. The book is addressed to researchers interested in development, face perception, and autism.

Schneider, Wolfgang; Schumann-Hengsteler, Ruth; Sodian, Beate

Schopler, Eric; Mesibov, Gary B.
This first-of-its-kind volume describes the cognitive and educational characteristics of people with autism. Leading experts in the field contribute papers to this book, explaining intervention techniques and strategies. Of special interest is a chapter by a successful high-functioning woman with autism who discusses special learning problems and unique learning strengths that characterize her development and offers specific suggestions for working with people like herself. Parents, researchers, professionals, and clinicians interested in educating people with autism will appreciate this volume.

Sousa, David A.
From the author of the bestselling How the Brain Learns comes an innovative book dealing with special needs students. How the Special Needs Brain Learns helps you turn research on the brain function of students with various learning challenges into practical classroom activities and strategies. David Sousa shows how the brain processes information and examines both simple and complex learning strategies that can be adapted and taught to your students. The first step for students with learning disabilities is helping them build self-esteem by teaching them how to work in groups and giving them strategies for engagement and retention. This book focuses on the most common challenges to learning for many students, especially for those who are often the first candidates for special education referral, and emphasizes lifelong independent learning, increased retention, and cognitive flexibility for all. Sousa builds on the latest brain research to discuss teaching strategies for students challenged by: ADHD/ADD Speech Disabilities Reading Disabilities Writing Disabilities Math Disabilities Sleep Disorders Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Autism Asperger s Syndrome

Striano, Tricia
How we perceive and interpret the actions of others is crucial if we are to develop into healthy adults. It has even been argued that a lack of social cognitive skills lays a strong foundation for a variety of atypical developmental disorders, including autism. Fortunately, our understanding of how humans process and interpret each other's actions has increased by leaps and bounds in the past decade. At the vanguard of these encouraging developments has been groundbreaking research in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, developmental psychology, and autism. Social Cognition: Development, Neuroscience and Autism is the first volume to fully integrate these areas of cutting-edge research on social cognition through contributions from some of the world's foremost experts in all three disciplines. The text is edited by distinguished development specialists who preface each section with chapter by chapter summaries that seamlessly link each of the contributing essays. Sections include related chapters on perspectives on social cognition, social cognition during infancy, social cognition and the adult brain, and social cognition: the challenge of autism. The text's final section serves as a commentary highlighting the fundamental issues that have been addressed in the text. Social Cognition: Development, Neuroscience and Autism is an indispensable addition to the rapidly expanding field of social cognition--and will provide valuable new insights on how we think and learn.

Swingle, Paul
Neurofeedback is a cutting-edge, drug-free therapeutic technique used by over a thousand licensed therapists in North America to treat a range of conditions from attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders to epilepsy, stroke, anxiety, migraine, and depression. First popularized in the 1970s, this naturalistic method is based on the idea that we can control our brain activity and that, through training, the brain can learn to modify its own electrical patterns for more efficient processing or to overcome various states of dysfunction. In Biofeedback for the Brain, Dr. Paul G. Swingle describes in clear and coherent language how these procedures work. With numerous actual case examples, readers follow the progress of clients from the initial "brain map" that shows the location and severity of the neurological abnormalities to the various stages of treatment. Conditions often considered untreatable by conventional health practitioners respond positively to neurotherapeutic treatment and Swingle describes many of these remarkable recoveries. Other chapters describe the use of neurotherapy for a variety of surprising purposes, including performance training for elite athletes, of which the most famous example is the Italian soccer team who considered the technique to be their "secret weapon" in attaining a World Cup victory. Despite wide-ranging success stories and the endorsement of the American Psychological Association, many health care practitioners remain skeptical of neurofeedback and the procedures are still not well-known by the public or conventional health care providers. This book provides a thorough, definitive, and highly readable presentation of this remarkable health care alternative that offers millions of individuals a chance for healing.

Teacher Created Materials
Choose from the best multiple intelligences activities in Teacher Created Materials' resource books. Activities for various grade levels are provided for all eight of the intelligences in each curriculum area: language arts, science, math, social studies, and the arts.

Terr, Leonore
This practical casebook and widely adopted text presents effective, creative approaches to helping children who have experienced such stressful situations as parental death or divorce, abuse and neglect, violence in the school or community, and natural disasters. While the book retains the focus on in-depth case studies that made prior editions so popular, 17 of the 21 chapters are entirely new, and all chapters reflect the latest knowledge on crisis intervention, trauma, and short-term play therapy. Timely new topics include the crisis of parental military deployment, the impact of Hurricane Katrina on families, immigration-related trauma, terrorism, and disrupted adoption.

Winner, Michelle Garcia
Students with social cognitive learning deficits face enormous challenges not only in their day-to-day relations with the world around them, but also in the fact that few professionals, educational or medical, understand the core of these student's deficits. One fundamental deficit relates to perspective taking - the ability of one person to consider the point of view and motives of another. Although this sounds like a simple process, it is in fact a hugely complex task that is crucial to successful interpersonal relations, and is a skill that anyone with a social cognition disability will struggle with. This book addresses the different ways this problem can present itself, the current thinking on how to approach the problem and a dearth of exercises and activities that can immediately be applied to the student. Illustrated with clear diagrams and tables, and with photocopiable handouts, this accessible text will be invaluable for anyone assessing, living with or teaching children and adults with this most abstract of all learning disabilities.

Wittgenstein, Ludwig
Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations presents his own distillation of two decades of intense work on the philosophies of mind, language and meaning. When first published in 1953, it immediately entered the centre of philosophical debate, and achieved a classic status it has retained ever since. This revised German-English edition is published on the fiftieth anniversary of Wittgenstein's death. It incorporates final revisions by G. E. M. Anscombe (1919-2001) to her original English translation.

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